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Demystifying the Mystery Shop

Posted on 6/17/16 9:44 AM

Some refer to themselves as mystery shoppers, secret shoppers or even undercover agents. The fact of the matter is, “mystery shopping” is about monitoring the quality of employee interaction through the eyes of the customer. The results provide a snapshot in time to give retailers/grocers/restaurant owners an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses.

An estimated 2.5 million mystery shoppers serve as the eyes and ears for those clients in an effort to enhance the customer experience and in some instances determine adherence to the client’s policies and procedures. Many times, the information collected during mystery shopping programs is used to help the client improve training programs, better articulate expectations they have of their staff, and otherwise improve the ways in which the client serves its customers.

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Topics: Mystery Shopping, Retail, Secret Shopping, ICU

We Should All Have The Disney Store Problem

Posted on 2/5/16 10:00 AM

If your business is Main Street, customer or guest service is one of the pillars in your market share strategy. Some companies map out a coherent, action-filled process and practice to achieve their customer service goals. Some
companies just take a “fluff” approach. Social scientists have, of course, studied the employee-customer interaction experience and measured every aspect that is remotely measurable. The results are clear. Positive interactions result in customers spending more time in-store, spending more money, buying more add-ons, and making future returns to shop again. 
Unfortunately, customer experience shops (e.g. Mystery shops) often demonstrate that regardless of policy or process, the experience hinges on the individual employee…and sometimes what kind of day they are having or how busy they might be. So while the “customer experience” remains critical, the execution isn’t always consistent. The problem isn’t process and it’s not driven by a lack of commitment at the top level. The problem with customer service is more the battle between theory and practice. In theory leadership fully supports a positive experience, but in practice we do a really good job of making it second to just about every other task a store faces. In doing so, we send a conflicting message—deliver an exceptional experience, but also get all this other stuff done. Since the “stuff” is more easily and quickly measured it becomes the real employee priority. 
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Topics: Mystery Shopping, customer service

We Should All Have this Disney Store Problem

Posted on 10/21/14 12:00 PM

If your business is Main Street, customer or guest service is one of the pillars in your market share strategy. Some companies map out a coherent, action-filled process and practice to achieve their customer service goals. Some companies just take a “fluff” approach. Social scientists have, of course, studied the employee-customer interaction experience and measured every aspect that is remotely measurable. The results are clear. Positive interactions result in customers spending more time in-store, spending more money, buying more add-ons, and making future returns to shop again. 
Unfortunately, customer experience shops (e.g. Mystery shops) often demonstrate that regardless of policy or process, the experience hinges on the individual employee…and sometimes what kind of day they are having or how busy they might be. So while the “customer experience” remains critical, the execution isn’t always consistent. The problem isn’t process and it’s not driven by a lack of commitment at the top level. The problem with customer service is more the battle between theory and practice. In theory leadership fully supports a positive experience, but in practice we do a really good job of making it second to just about every other task a store faces. In doing so, we send a conflicting message—deliver an exceptional experience, but also get all this other stuff done. Since the “stuff” is more easily and quickly measured it becomes the real employee priority. 
Read More

Topics: Mystery Shopping, customer service

Demystifying the Mystery Shop

Posted on 10/7/14 10:43 AM

Some refer to themselves as mystery shoppers, secret shoppers or even undercover agents. The fact of the matter is, “mystery shopping” is about monitoring the quality of employee interaction through the eyes of the customer. The results provide a snapshot in time to give retailers/grocers/restaurant owners an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses.

An estimated 2.5 million mystery shoppers serve as the eyes and ears for those clients in an effort to enhance the customer experience and in some instances determine adherence to the client’s policies and procedures. Many times, the information collected during mystery shopping programs is used to help the client improve training programs, better articulate expectations they have of their staff, and otherwise improve the ways in which the client serves its customers.

Read More

Topics: Mystery Shopping

5 Things You're Not Paying Attention to in Your Mystery Shop

Posted on 9/3/13 2:00 PM

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Topics: Mystery Shopping

Ten Tips to Unraveling a Mystery Shopping Program

Posted on 11/29/11 10:30 AM

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Topics: Loss Prevention program and development, Mystery Shopping